Projects Under Progress


1. Exposition of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

This project has been initiated by Dr. Gulzar Singh Kang, Professor in the Centre and it will incorporate some new features concerning the exposition of Gurbani. We intend to integrate in it modern as well as traditional knowledge of the Sikh Scripture and for that Singh Sahib Giani Joginder Singh Vedanti, has very kindly consented to give his services in honorary capacity. So far besides working on the style sheet and methodology first draft of the exposition up to Sri Raga has been done. In order to get response of the public as well as of the Sikh scholars, A Comprehensive Exposition of Japuji has been published.
• Exposition of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Vol. 1 has been completed

2. Up-gradation of Bibliography on Sikh Studies

The discipline of Sikh Studies which was confined only to the Punjab has come a long way and now it has become a part of University curriculum even in North America. Prof. Ganda Singh had produced a Bibliography of Sikhism way back in 1965. It is a very good and useful research tool for the scholars doing Sikh Studies. Since its first publication it has not been revised so far. Resultantly, no unified data regarding the books and research articles published in the last 50 years on Sikh Studies is available to the scholars. The Centre has initiated a project to upgrade it in a most comprehensive manner. Hopefully it will be completed in the current session.
• Bibliography on Sikh Studies (in Punjabi) has been completed (Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Rupinder Kaur)
• Bibliography on Sikh Studies (in English) has completed (Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Sandeep Kaur)

3. Descriptive Catalogue of Devotional Literature in Gurumukhi:

The Sikh sources in the form of Manuscripts are lying scattered in different public and private libraries. For the scholars doing Sikh Studies access to them is very difficult. Even most of the libraries have no catalogue which may guide the researchers in this regard. For academic use, description and analysis of the contents of these MSS are of utmost importance. In this work descriptive catalogue of devotional literature in Gurmukhi irrespective of religious affiliation will be prepared. This project is being executed by a team of Project Fellows under the supervision of Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon. In the first phase MSS that are available in GND University, Khalsa College, Sikh Reference Library etc. will be taken into account. Presently, analysis of manuscripts of GNDU library, Khalsa College and Sikh Reference Library is in progress.


• Descriptive Catalogue of Gurmukhi Manuscripts has been completed. Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co. Eds.Rajbir Kaur, Rajwinder Singh

4. Documentation of Relics of the Sikh Gurus

The Sikh heritage in the form of relics so far has not found attention at the hands of scholars. Unfortunately, no documentation of the Sikh relics especially their movement in history, present custodians, details about their size and material has been done so far. Some of the relics of the Sikh Gurus and their Sikhs have been lost forever and some have decayed beyond repair because proper preservation techniques have not been followed. The Centre has taken upon itself to document these relics on professional and academic norms. This documentation will contain all the details regarding the present custodians besides the minute details regarding their shape, size and material. It involves a lot of field work and travelling besides a high quality photography and videography. To accomplish this very ambitious and onerous project the Centre has engaged S. Gurbir Singh Brar as Visiting Professor who is an established author and an accomplished photographer. It is heartening to note that about 95% of field work has been done. When the project is completed it will be virtually a journey in the bye lanes of Sikh history. In the current year Centre intends to publish the material that is associated with Guru Gobind Singh’s sojourn in the Malwa, especially Takht Damdama Sahib Talwandi Sabo.


• Documentation of Relics of the Sikh Gurus has been completed by S. Gurbir Singh Brar and Salinder Singh
• Takhat Sri Damdama Sahib History and Relics of Malwa in Punjabi (In Process) Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Salinder Singh

5. Persian Sources on the Sikh Gurus

Persian had been a state language of India for almost seven hundred years. In the face of dearth of contemporary Sikh sources, evidence of primary Persian sources for doing the history of Sikh religion is of crucial importance. These Persian sources are scattered all over India in the State Archives and libraries. For the benefit of researchers access to these sources is very difficult, besides lack of knowledge of Persian is a big stumbling block to consult them. In order to overcome this problem Centre has taken up the project on Persian sources on the Sikh Gurus. The proposed research project is being carried out by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon. It will take into account the Persian sources that had originated in the eighteenth century. About forty five Persian writings have been identified and text of thirty of them has been procured. Translation of these sources into Punjabi is in progress. Translation and analysis of the evidence of an eighteenth century Persian source, Haqiqat-i-Bina-i-Wa-Uruz-i-Firqa-i-Sikhan has been published.


• Khair-Ul-Majalis by Hamid Kalandari (Translation Persian to Punjabi) By Prof. Balwant Singh, Research Fellows: Lakhvir Kaur and Mohd. Altaf Bhat.

6. Writing Sikh Philosophy on Its Own Terms:

The Centre has undertaken a project work handled by Dr. N. Muthu Mohan, Professor in the Centre , titled “Writing Sikh Philosophy on Its Own Terms”. In recent times, Sikh Philosophy has come under serious criticisms under the banner of Post Colonial writings that modern representations of Sikh philosophy are dominated by Western paradigms and conceptual tools, so it becomes necessary to decolonize the Sikh philosophy from its modern and colonial influence. It means that we have to take up the task of writing Sikh Philosophy on its Own Terms. The present Project takes up that job. It explores the Hermeneutic situation into which the Sikhs were thrown during the colonial period, from the beginning of 19th century. During this period, the Sikhs had encountered a complex epistemological situation which might be named as “Double Exposure” where the Sikhs faced the pressure of the Western paradigms on the one hand, and that of the emerging Hinduism on the other hand. While post colonialism mostly deals with the Western constructions and attempts to decolonize Sikhism, it fails to see the more immediate and more “intimate” danger of the Internal forms of colonialism in terms of Hinduism, for example. It must be mentioned here that the Aryan-Brahman construction of Hinduism by the collaborative efforts of western orientalists and nationalist elite of India was a grand ideological exercise during the colonial period that continues its influence till today. In such a condition, the present Project takes up the problem of differentiating the pre-colonial, colonial and post colonial in Sikh Philosophy and attempts to identify how the modern Sikh scholarship tried to travel through the narrow lanes between the Western and Hindu-Indian paradigms. It was indeed a challenging task of struggle against the imperial constructions in the last two centuries with a lot of political implications. Apart from looking into the hermeneutic challenges exploring the epistemological foundations of the colonial conditions, the Project revisits into the Sikh concepts such as Sat, Naam, Guru, Shabad, Bani, Sangat, Sewa etc. and tries to reveal their original and unique contribution to the making of Sikh philosophy.


• Writing Sikh Philosophy on Its Own Terms has been completed by Dr. N. Muthu Mohan.

7. Critical Text of the Primary Sources on Sikh History and Religion

The Sikh literary activities date back to the times of Sikh Gurus. Besides the works on exposition of Gurbani and other forms of literature such as Janamsakhis, Goshtis, Bhagatmalas, Rahitnamas, Parchies, Gurbilases, Panth Parkashes, Bansawalies, Jangnamas etc. in prose and poetry form the bed rock of Sikh literary history of 18th century. Many of these works are still in manuscript form. The scholars of Sikh Studies are in need of their correct and authentic text. The centre has initiated a number of studies wherein besides establishing the correct text of these works an appraisal of them will be provided. First of all in this respect, manuals relating to the Sikh Rahit will be edited. Studies relating to Rahitnamas of Bhai Chaupa Singh, Bhai Nand Lal and Bhai Prahlad Singh are in their advanced stage.


• Authentic Version of Rehatnama Sahit of Bhai Nand Lal (in Punjabi) has been completed. Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Lakhvir Kaur, Harpreet Kaur
• Authentic Versionof Rehatnama of Bhai Choupa Singh (in Punjabi) has been completed. Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Mrs. Bindu, Sukhpal Singh.
• Guru Kian Saakhian has been Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon Co-Ed. Mrs. Bindu
• See-Harfian S. Hari Singh Nalua has been Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Salinder Singh
• Letters of Bhai Vir Singh has been completed (in Punjabi) Edited by Salinder Singh
• Das Guru Katha has been completed Edited by Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon and Co-Ed. Rajwinder Singh

8. Glossary of Musicology of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

The Sikh Scripture is a Raga oriented Scripture. The whole text has been arranged into 31 Ragas and some of them further appear in composite forms. Some folk tunes and genres have also been preserved in the Sikh Scripture. There are a number of musical terms and references that occur in the Text. In order to understand the significance of Sri Guru Granth Sahib from musical point of view a glossary of musical terms holds great merit. This project is being done by a project fellow under the guidance of Bhai Baldeep Singh. Its first draft is ready but it needs further polishing.


• Gurbani Sangeet: A Bibliography has been completed by Ruby Vij
• Interview of Kirtankaars (in press) Edited by Dr. Jatinder Singh and Dr. Ruby vij
• Prachin Reet Ratanavali (Vol. III) (Completed) by Dr. Jatinder Singh and Dr. Ruby Vij
• Glossary of Gurbani Sangeet (in Progress) by Dr. Jatinder Singh and Dr. Ruby Vij

9. A Critique of Literature on Gurbani Sangeet:

: Gurbani Sangeet has come to us in two forms i.e. written treatises and recordings/renderings in the shape of CDs. This project has been undertaken by Bhai Baldeep Singh, Visiting Professor in the Centre. It intends to review all these forms of Gurbani Sangeet with a view to assess the developments that have taken place since its inception.

10. Impact of Sri Guru Granth Sahib on the Sikh Diaspora

It is a small treatise done by Dr. Gurcharan Singh, Ottawa, Canada Honorary Visiting Professor in the Centre which underlines role of Sri Guru Granth Sahib in the life of Sikh Diaspora of North America. It has been published in the 2013 issue of the Journal of the Centre.


• Impact of Sri Guru Granth Sahib on the Sikh Diaspora has been completed by Dr. Gurcharan Singh, Ottawa.

11. The Role of Sri Guru Granth Sahib for Religious Harmony:

The Sikh Scripture is a living model of Interfaith Understanding. Its message of goodwill, peace, brotherhood, service to humankind transcends the barriers of caste, creed, ethnicity and regionalism. In this small but very valuable write-up Dr. Gurnam Singh Sanghera, Burnby, Canada, Honorary Visiting Professor in the Centre focuses on the relevance of Sri Guru Granth Sahib for religious harmony. It has been published in the 2013 issue of the Journal of the Centre.


• The Role of Sri Guru Granth Sahib for Religious Harmony has been completed Dr. Gurnam Singh Sanghera

12. Dictionary of Gurbani

Late S. Manmohan Singh while working on the English translation of Sri Guru Granth Sahib, had worked on a Dictionary for finding out English words equivalent to terminology used in Gurbani. It has not been published. Dr. Surinder Kaur, D/o S. Manmohan Singh has approached the Centre to edit and publish it. It is a very useful piece of research to do translation of Gurbani into English. The Centre has taken up this project and work on its editing is in progress.

13. Sikh Perspective on the Others: A Source Book

Sri Guru Granth Sahib is the fountain-head of Sikh way of life. Its message is holistic in nature and for the whole of humanity. It does not believe in segregation of society on caste and creed. It believes that all the human beings share a common origin i.e. Fatherhood of God whereby all the people are children of God. It is a strong votary of peaceful co-existence in which there is no room for communalism. Besides the holy writings of the Sikh Gurus the Sikh Scripture comprises the sacred writings of the Hindu Bhagats and Muslim Sufis. Beginning with Guru Nanak all the Sikh Gurus enjoyed cordial relationship with the people of other faiths. They believed in enmity to none and friendship with all. They desired to preserve the pluralistic character of society and aspired for welfare of the whole humanity. The Sikh vision regarding the others that how we can accommodate one and another without losing our respective identities is very much relevant for the modern world. However, all these precepts regarding the others are found scattered here and there in the Sikh Scripture, historical writings and manuals of code of conduct. In order to articulate the Sikh view point one is required to go through the whole mass of Sikh literature which requires tremendous input. To facilitate the general public as well as the scholars interested in this area of Sikh Studies the proposed research work has been undertaken. It will comprise all the references in the form of a source book. This project is being carried out by Dr. Amarjit Singh who is well acquainted with the Sikh textual sources.


• Sikh Perspective on the Others: A Source Book by Dr. Amarjit Singh is in publication process.

14. A Descriptive List of the Manuscripts of Sri Guru Granth Sahib:

The Scripture of the Sikhs, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, ever since its first canonization by Guru Arjan in 1604 and its subsequent installation in Darbar Sahib Amritsar, has been considered the most authentic repository of devotional writings of the Sikh Gurus and of the other contributors as well. It is a fact that various groups and sectarian elements within the Panth continued to transmit Gurbani in their own manner. Subsequently, some variant readings had crept into its text. Guru Gobind Singh in 1706 finalized the text once for all and before his demise in Oct. 1708 bestowed upon it Guruship and thus the Holy Scripture came to be known as Sri Guru Granth Sahib. However before and after the above epoch making event the Sikh Text continued to be in circulation in the form of manuscripts. These manuscripts, the number of which may be above one thousand are found scattered all over the Sikh world. The proposed project attempts to document all these manuscripts wherein data relating to their custodians, physiognomy and textual peculiarities will be provided. This project has been undertaken by Dr. Amar Singh who has done extensive field work to locate and digitize these works.

15. Persian-Arabic Glossary of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

There are more than one thousand Persian words that have been employed by the contributors of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Without getting into the proper meanings of these words, it is very difficult to understand their occurrence and connotation in Gurbani. With the help of Dr. Amarwant Singh (formerly Professor and Head of Persian Department, Punjabi University, Patiala) the centre has worked on the Persian-Arabic Glossary of Sri Guru Granth Sahib. It contains about three thousand entries wherein besides the root meanings in Persian, their occurrence in Gurbani along with their context and examples have been explained. This project has been completed.

16. Value System of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

The Sikh Scripture has propounded a new kind of World view which is all inclusive and holistic in nature. It stands for balance and harmony between the temporal and the spiritual known as Miri-Piri system. The authors of Sikh Scripture had envisioned a society free from all kinds of evil where human beings may experience the Bliss of God in this very life. It required total transformation of human personality wedded to the values of highest kind. This project undertaken by Dr. Jaswinder Kaur Dhillon, Visiting Professor deals with the Value System of Sri Guru Granth Sahib from axiological perspective. To make the Hindi knowing world the ethical precepts of Sikh Scripture this work has been especially produced in Hindi.

17.Dictionary of Gurmat

Late S. Manmohan Singh while working on the English translation of Sri Guru Granth Sahib, had worked on a Dictionary for finding out English words equivalent to terminology used in Gurbani. It has not been published. Dr. Surinder Kaur, D/o S. Manmohan Singh has approached the Centre to edit and publish it. It is a very useful piece of research to do translation of Gurbani into English. The Centre has taken up this project and work on its editing is in progress.
• Gurmat Shabdavli Kosh Vol 1 (completed) Edited by Dr. Jaswinder Kaur Dhillon, Co-eds Rajbir Kaur, Bindu, Sandeep Kaur, Rupinder Kaur, Lakhvir Kaur.
• Gurmat Shabdavli Kosh Vol 1 (completed) Edited by Dr. Jaswinder Kaur Dhillon, Co-eds Rajbir Kaur, Bindu, Sandeep Kaur, Rupinder Kaur, Lakhvir Kaur.

18. A Descriptive List of the Manuscripts of Sri Guru Granth Sahib

The Scripture of the Sikhs, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, ever since its first canonization by Guru Arjan in 1604 and its subsequent installation in Darbar Sahib Amritsar, has been considered the most authentic repository of devotional writings of the Sikh Gurus and of the other contributors as well. It is a fact that various groups and sectarian elements within the Panth continued to transmit Gurbani in their own manner. Subsequently, some variant readings had crept into its text. Guru Gobind Singh in 1706 finalized the text once for all and before his demise in Oct. 1708 bestowed upon it Guruship and thus the Holy Scripture came to be known as Sri Guru Granth Sahib. However before and after the above epoch making event the Sikh Text continued to be in circulation in the form of manuscripts. These manuscripts, the number of which may be above one thousand are found scattered all over the Sikh world. The proposed project attempts to document all these manuscripts wherein data relating to their custodians, physiognomy and textual peculiarities will be provided. This project has been undertaken by Dr. Amar Singh who has done extensive field work to locate and digitize these works.